Monday Success: Kyle Kline Pre-Calc Video

Mar 4, 2013 by

Every week on Monday I  share a classroom success story that started with teachers using technology.  PLEASE SHARE your stories of success in the classroom so other teachers are willing to take chances too!  Last week we heard from Kyle Kline, a teacher in Indiana I have worked with and who has a new blog at http://mrklineskronicles.blogspot.com/ .  Kyle is back this week talking about using video in his Pre-Calculus class.

“After attending your workshop in November, I decided to try the video activity with my Pre-Calculus class.  I gave them only 3 requirements for the assignment:

1.) The video had to be at least 1 minute in length.

2) All group members had to be on camera.

3.) The video had to cover a past topic learned or anything from the upcoming  chapter.

By allowing the students so much freedom, I figured it would give the students plenty of creative flexibility.  The students “loved” this assignment.  It taught them many things besides just math.  It required the students to collaborate with others, it required them to create a YouTube account to upload their video, and it required them to learn how to use different sources of technology as well.  After all the videos were submitted, we watched them in each of my 3 classes.  This gave the students a little more motivation to “up their game” in front of their peers.  Overall, I would say the quality of videos was decent.  There were the excellent videos and then there were the videos that followed the rubric but may not have been the most pleasing to the rest of the class.  I’m planning on doing a similar project this semester with my Pre-Calculus classes again.  However, this time I might make the requirements a little stricter.  I figure I can do this all the while still letting the students use their creativity to their fullest.”

This is a great example of how to start using video in your class without overwhelming you or your students.  For those of you who are concerned about or have policies against using YouTube, you could always create a Google Drive, Dropbox, or Edmodo account and have the students submit their videos there.  At the end of the day, as Kyle mentioned, the students LOVED the assignment, learned way more than just math, and were ENGAGED IN LEARNING which should always be the goal.  I am sure Kyle will continue to tweak his video assignments to figure out what works best for him.  I encourage you to do the same in your class and I applaud Kyle for showing us all one way to get started.  Thank you Kyle.

 

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